VETERANS DAY – 2013

In November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day with the following words: “To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…”In November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day with the following words: “To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…”

 

http://www.va.gov/opa/vetsday/vetdayhistory.asp

 

 

On the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, an armistice, or temporary cessation of hostilities, was declared between the Allied nations and Germany in the First World War, then known as “the Great War.” Commemorated as Armistice Day beginning the following year, November 11th became a legal federal holiday in the United States in 1938. In the aftermath of World War II and the Korean War, Armistice Day became Veterans Day, a holiday dedicated to American veterans of all wars.

 

 

WRITING OPPORTUNITIES FOR WOMEN VETERANS

 MAMF Writer in Residence Caroline LeBlanc recently spoke to a group of women Veterans at the Kirtland Air Force Base Women Veterans Appreciation luncheon. Here’s what she had to say:

People listening to speaker

 

I am very happy to be here with all of you women veterans and to have the honor of speaking to  you today about writing opportunities for women veterans in Albuquerque.

 

Every woman in this room has a story—actually many stories.  Some you tell freely.  Others, you hold close.  Some  you may even put on paper.  In a journal, perhaps.   In letters or family histories.  More self-revealing souls, in another kind of bravery, write for strangers to read.  You may write fiction or non-fiction, prose or poetry, plays, memoirs or blogs—all of the above or something I have not named.  » Read more

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