MILITARY FAMILY MEMORIAL TO BE UNVEILED IN SANTA FE ON MAY 13

 For immediate release

 For additional information: Dr. Circe Olson Woessner, (505) 504-6830

MILITARY FAMILY MEMORIAL TO BE UNVEILED IN SANTA FE ON MAY 13

Museum of the American Military Family Partners with the New Mexico National Guard

“Because our military families are so diverse, when we started to design our memorial, we decided to use a house because no matter which generation or which branch of service, we all keep the home fires burning – home is where our hearts are,” Museum of the Military Family (MAMF) Executive Director Dr. Circe Olson Woessner says. “We are proud to have created such a unique memorial to the mothers and fathers, sons and daughters, spouses, and others who have loved and supported a member of the U.S. Armed Forces.”

The Military Family Memorial is possible because of a grant from the Kerr Foundation and the generosity of companies like Lowe’s, RAKS, and of the National Guard, veterans’ organizations, and many individuals, especially “members of our all-volunteer board of directors, and extended Facebook family.”

The memorial is a small house, designed by Woessner and configured for a static display of family memorabilia by Museum special projects manager Paul Silva, a Sandia National Laboratories retiree. Through each of five windows, visitors can look upon displays depicting the life of a military member, of children, of spouses.

The Memorial is located on the grounds of the New Mexico National Guard Museum (formerly the Bataan Memorial Museum) in Santa Fe. It will be dedicated on May 13 at 1:00 p.m. during a weekend Guard commemoration of the end of World War II in Europe.

Army veteran and graphic designer Dominic Ruiz created the panels. He said the monument would teach people about military life and allow individuals familiar with it to reminisce. “For me, it brought back a lot of memories,” Ruiz says.

Woessner says, “I don’t know if there are any other memorials dedicated to the military family and I am grateful that the National Guard leadership recognizes the family as an essential component of military service and supports having our memorial right at the entrance to their own museum.”

For more information about the Museum of the American Military Family, visit www.militaryfamilymuseum.org or write to Museum of the American Military Family, P.O. Box 5085, Albuquerque, NM 87185. Tel: (505) 504-6830.

 

 

We are looking for a volunteer Brat Liaison

The Museum of the American Military Family is looking for a volunteer Brat Liaison to join our team. This is a virtual position, so the candidate can live anywhere. The ideal candidate should be comfortable with social media, be active in Brat Communities, both on-line and in his/her local area. The candidate should be willing to write articles for blogs and newsletters and be creative, independent and interested in fulfilling the museum’s mission.

Interested candidates should send a letter of interest/qualifications with contact to: Director, MAMF
Subject line- Brat Liaison

to the following email:
Militaryfamilymuseum@comcast.net

Proclamation

The White House

Office of the Press Secretary

For Immediate Release

March 01, 2017

President Donald J. Trump Proclaims March 2017 as Women’s History Month

WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH, 2017

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

We are proud of our Nation’s achievements in promoting women’s full participation in all aspects of American life and are resolute in our commitment to supporting women’s continued advancement in America and around the world.

America honors the celebrated women pioneers and leaders in our history, as well as those unsung women heroes of our daily lives.  We honor those outstanding women, whose contributions to our Nation’s life, culture, history, economy, and families have shaped us and helped us fulfill America’s promise.

We cherish the incredible accomplishments of early American women, who helped found our Nation and explore the great western frontier.  Women have been steadfast throughout our battles to end slavery, as well as our battles abroad.  And American women fought for the civil rights of women and others in the suffrage and civil rights movements.  Millions of bold, fearless women have succeeded as entrepreneurs and in the workplace, all the while remaining the backbone of our families, our communities, and our country.

During Women’s History Month, we pause to pay tribute to the remarkable women who prevailed over enormous barriers, paving the way for women of today to not only participate in but to lead and shape every facet of American life.  Since our beginning, we have been blessed with courageous women like Henrietta Johnson, the first woman known to work as an artist in the colonies; Margaret Corbin, who bravely fought in the American Revolution; and Abigail Adams, First Lady of the United States and trusted advisor to President John Adams.

We also remember incredible women like Mary Walker, the first woman to receive the Congressional Medal of Honor; Harriet Tubman, who escaped slavery in 1849 and went on to free hundreds of others through the Underground Railroad; Susan B. Anthony, the publisher and editor of The Revolution and her friend, Dr. Charlotte Lozier, one of the first women medical doctors in the United States, both of whom advocated for the dignity and equality of women, pregnant mothers, and their children; Rosa Parks, whose refusal to give up her seat accelerated the modern civil rights movement; Shirley Temple Black, the famous actress turned diplomat and first chief of protocol for the President of the United States; Anna Bissell, the first woman CEO in American history; Amelia Earhart, the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean; Ella Fitzgerald, the First Lady of Song and the Queen of Jazz; and Sally Ride, the first American woman astronaut.

America will continue to fight for women’s rights and equality across the country and around the world.  Though poverty holds back many women, America cannot and will not allow this to persist.  We will empower all women to pursue their American dreams, to live, work and thrive in safe communities that allow them to protect and provide for themselves and their families.

America is also mindful of the fight that continues for so many women around the world, where women are often not protected and treated disgracefully as second-class citizens.  America will fight for these women too, and it will fight to protect young girls who are robbed of their rights, trafficked around the world, and exploited.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, DONALD J. TRUMP, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim March 2017 as Women’s History Month.  I call upon all Americans to observe this month with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand seventeen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and forty-first.

DONALD J. TRUMP

 

Military Loved Ones and the Internet

By Libby Hopkins
Until Vietnam, American wars were truly an enigma to families and the country back home.  Still photos, long awaited letters, films created by United States officials, and news reports whose information came from government spokespeople were all that loved ones and the American public could see.  In contrast, due to most American families having television in their homes by the time of Vietnam, actual visual footage of war was broadcast directly into regular Americans’ living rooms.

Fast forward to the present, real time news with graphic visuals transmitted digitally by embedded reporters is commonplace.  Further, loved ones can often communicate with their deployed service members in actual time via email, text or Facebook messaging, and can even see one another and the troops’ surroundings while communicating via Skype, Face Time or the like.  Consequently, parents, spouses and other loved ones can have access to up-to-the-minute information about the service member and his/her unit’s whereabouts, combat situation, location, movements, schedule and leave expectations.  When a loved one gets excited and innocently shares that information with friends and loved ones publicly on social media, there can be dire consequences.

Something as simple as, “So excited that John’s coming home from Fallujah on Thursday in time for the birth of the baby”, posted on Facebook or Twitter, could trigger consequences ranging from the entire unit’s leave being delayed or cancelled, to tipping off the enemy as to the unit’s plans to move out, possibly jeopardizing missions, damaging national security, causing territory to be overtaken or even the loss of American or allied troops, or civilian lives. » Read more

1 3 4 5 6 7 9